Project Boudoir: Making the Bed-Jacket

Hello again. :)

After a row of evenings spent sewing up the Regency bed-jacket, I have finally made some time to tell you about the making-of. It all started out with wondering about how to pattern a  bed-jacket at all. It is not really a staple Regency item, sewn by costumers and hence, there are not really many pre-made patterns around. But then… I had an idea:

More or less by accident, I started looking at Regency-era men’s shirts. Just as the bed-jacket I showed you before, they are made from light linen or cotton fabrics. They are also no less frilly than the jacket in question. Here it is again.

The extant bed-jacket.

Now if you compare it to an extant gentleman’s shirt… it looks quite similar, right?

An extant men’s shirt from the Met’s collection (c. 1816).

Luckily, there are a good few shirt-making tutorials available online. The two I liked best were Kelly’s tutorial and this one from Marquise. After some measuring and drafting around, I decided to make the bed-jacket, based on Kelly’s instructions, with a few minor alterations. These are the following:

 

Pattern Pieces & Measurements
As I am no, tall, dashing Mr. Sharpe or Mr. Darcy, but a rather petite lady, the main thing I did was to scale down the pattern pieces to my measurements. But I also added a front closure to the shirt’s body and omitted some pieces, such as the side-seam gusset at the bottom or the neck ruffle. Instead of that ruffle, though, I cut two extra ruffles for the cuffs and another for the collar. Here is an overview of the pieces for my bed-jacket, including seam allowances of 7/8″ on each side:

  • Two front pieces, each 28″ x 18″
    (The finished fronts will overlap a bit, if you would like a button placket, add another 2 inches.)
  • One back piece, 28″ x 34″
  • Sleeves, each 19″ x 36″
    (This is a very generous measurement, creating a very poofy sleeve. For something more fitted, take a measurement of your upper arm, add seam allowances and double it.)
  • Two collar pieces, each 4″ x 19″
  • Four cuff pieces, each 10 1/2″ x 3 1/2″
  • Two shoulder gussets, 2″ x 2
  • Two underarm gussets, 5″ x 5″
  • One collar ruffle, 52″ x 3 1/2″
  • Two cuff ruffles, 18″ x 4″

 

Making Up

All in all, I followed Kelly’s wonderful instructions. But, here again, a few changes were needed to adjust for shape and sizing:

Around the top of the jacket, I only sewed up a 4-inch shoulder seam on either side. to this, the shoulder gusset added another 2 inches and made for a comfy shoulder fit. Usually, I am not big on gussets, but shoulder gussets are just awesome.

The next thing was that I used two front pieces. So I did not have to cut a slit and simply hemmed the front ends before gathering it all into the collar. I later fastened the jacket with a length of soft cotton tape at the top, right below the collar hem.

As you might have noticed, I used four cuff pieces, instead of two. The reason for this is that I gathered and then sandwiched the ruffles between two cuffs before attaching everything to the gathered sleeve. When assembling the collar, I did the same again.

At the bottom of the sleeves, I left a shorter slit of 3″, to fit my slender wrists. If that is too wide, you can also tack or button the slit shut below the cuffs. But, if you choose to tack, make sure that your wrists still fit through comfortably.

 

And that was it already…

As for everything else, no more big changes were necessary. And I think this is the place to give Kelly another big thank you. Without her blogging about the shirt, there would have been no bed jacket.
But now there is. (Yay!) Even though it is a little too late for the HSF “Re-Do” challenge, I will try to get a few photos to put into a challenge post over the next few days.

Maybe, in the meanwhile, some of you will start making their own Regency bed-jacket and/or matching shirt. Just like the jackets, it was not uncommon for gentlemen to slip a night-shirt over their shift to stay warm. With the holiday season at the door, it would certainly make for a very special present.

Cheers, Nessa

 

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