Head Coverings c. 1800: A simple linen cap

Following the old saying “out with the old in with the new” I will start the new year with a long overdue catch-up post. It will be one in a series, since there are still some pretty things from last year I would love to share with you. And with the new Historical Sew Monthly challenges and a heap of fresh sewing ideas, there are new projects awaiting as well.

Today I am going to provide you with some long overdue picture “spam” of the late 18th/early 19th century linen cap I made to go with my short gown. It is really simple but I love it to bits and wear it the most of all my Regency-era caps. For it I used view 3 (bottom left) from the Mill Farm late 18th-century caps pattern, with a few changes to the original make-up.

Mill Farm 18th-century caps pattern.

Mill Farm 18th-century caps pattern.

The changes I made were really few, based on personal taste. For once, I cut out two brim pieces and sandwiched the crown and trim between them. Here the pattern called for a single, hemmed brim to which the hemmed crown and ruffle are attached with whipped gathers. This is the more historically accurate approach for the late 18th century. Since I was not so happy with my whipped gathering skills and was using an itty bitty bobbin lace trim, I opted for the “sandwich” method instead.

Another thing I changed was to add a 1/4″ double-fold casing at the bottom of the crown. It holds a drawstring that holds my rebellious hair in check. I did not add anything for it, since this edge was originally reserved for a 1/4″ rolled hem. In the picture you can see the small hand-bound eyelets for the ties. They work very well on those naughty hairs. ;)

The crown with the finished drawstring casing.

The crown with the finished drawstring casing.

Once the casing was done, the cap went together quickly, even by hand. It helped that the linen was super soft and worked like a charm. The trickiest part was the fiddly eyelet lace for the trim. Though, once the ends were finished and it was attached, it looked so lovely. :) Here are a few images of the finished item, on both Jane (my hat form) and myself:

The finished linen cap, side view.

The finished linen cap, side view.

The finished cap, top view.

The finished cap, top view.

The finished cap, front view.

The finished cap, front view.

The cap on myself. :)

The cap on myself.

And a bit more of the back. :)

And a bit more of the back. :)

And that was it already. I cannot say often enough how happy this simple little project made me, since I completed it mid-thesis when I needed something pretty to distract myself from the work. Now the thesis is finally, finally handed in and I am looking forward to creating new, lovely items for my historical wardrobe.

Once I have fudged out what to make for this year’s HSM challenges, I will share my plans with you. If all works out, I am going to spend some time sewing outside my Regency comfort zone, trying out some new fashion eras. Some of you have already spotted my 1920s robe de style on the Facebook page. It has been my first venture into a different century. I will keep you posted on the other projects to come.

Wishing you all a happy, healthy and joyful 2017. I am excited to see your new, gorgeous sewing creations this year. :)

Until very soon, Nessa

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Head Coverings c. 1800: A simple linen cap

  1. Gina White says:

    Ooooh! Your cap is so lovely and I really like that sweet, little bitty eyelet lace on the edge! I always admire those who can make super small hems with their hands. My fingertips don’t cooperate with me, so my hems always end up large! Well done!
    Blessings!
    g

    • Nessa says:

      Thank you so much, Gina! Usually my hands do not like making tiny hems either but there is a special rolled hem stitch to hack them. It is still fiddly but saved me on the corners of this cap. Wish me luck for the one that wants to be hemmed like this all around! :)
      Love,
      Nessa

Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s