Head Coverings c. 1800: A Bergére-style Bonnet

After another week full of jumble, I want to add a little prettiness to this last day of the week. So I am sharing with you (at last) the early-Regency hat I made for this month’s “Heroes” challenge at the Historical Sew Monthly. The task was to create an item inspired by one of our historical fashion or costuming heroes. Some of the entries I have seen so far are some absolutely stunning costumes offering homage to a wide scale of historical and fictional costume heroes. For example, this very gorgeous open robe Crystal made, inspired by Janet Arnold and some of our fellow historical costumers.

My own entry is a much smaller thing, due to the thesis having seen its hottest phase in July / August (perhaps you can spot some of the paper chaos going on in some of my photos ;) ). It is my third jab at making the bergére hat I have wanted to make for song long now. It is inspired by and based on this tutorial by the Dreamstress whose blog has been a big inspiration for me to get into historical costuming. This makes her my “hero” for the challenge.

But wait… is a bergére not more of an 18th-century item? You are right. Those flat-topped, wide-brimmed straw (and sometimes also felt) hats were an accessory that fit in with the “pastoral” themes of fashion throughout the 18th-century. Here is just one of the many portraits: Eleanor Frances Dixie wearing one of hers with a beautifully patterned sacque gown.

Eleanor Frances Dixie by Henry Pickering (c. 1753).

Eleanor Frances Dixie by Henry Pickering (c. 1753).

At the end of the 18th century, however, the bergére did not disappear completely. Instead it lingered around into the early Regency years (if not longer in the lower classes). Although an interesting new style of wearing these hats emerged around 1800. For this time, there is some proof of the hats being worn tied down with a scarf or ribbon. For once, I found this 1797 portrait by Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun of a young lady who seems to have secured hers against a storm.

Portrait of a Young Woman by Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun (c.1797; MFA Boston).

Portrait of a Young Woman by Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun (c.1797; MFA Boston).

And this portrait of Henrietta Marchant from 1800 shows the style I was going for more clearly:

Henrietta Marchant (Mrs. Robert Liston) by Gilbert Stuart (c.1800; National Gallery of Art).

Henrietta Marchant (Mrs. Robert Liston) by Gilbert Stuart (c.1800; National Gallery).

This style, which has informally also been called a “gypsy bonnet” because of its somewhat “adventurous” look was my solution to fit the bergére into my main costuming period. To help me along with shaping it, I used these tips from Jessamyn’s Regency Costume Companion website (scroll down to the “Bonnets” section). Here is how mine came out, in a few photos, from start to finish:

The hat I started with: A real straw boater from Claire's.

The hat I started with: A real straw boater from Claire’s.

I started with this straw hat my parents and I found on my birthday in July. Following the tutorial, I began by separating the crown from the brim, leaving the bottom three rows of it on the brim to be ironed down. I took out about two rows of straw braid in the middle and left the top bit of the crow as is. Since it already had quite sharp angles, I did not have to iron it. They brim I flattened into shape by putting it under a wet towel and ironing over it on medium-high. After sewing the two parts back together, the basic bergére was done.

The finished basic bergére.

The finished basic bergére.

While the hat was still flat, I trimmed it with a red bias strip, about 3/4″ wide after hemming. Bias is really fun to work with when trimming unevenly shaped hat or bonnets. As my hat was oval, it saved me some easing and swearing. ;)

Trimmed with the bias band.

Trimmed with the bias band.

Now came the fun part of molding the hat. This is not strictly necessary, but it makes tying the finished bonnet a lot easier since the brim does not need to be tackled into shape every time. For this I pinned the seam tape I used as a tie into the spot where I wanted it to sit and tied it down firmly on my hat stand. Then I sprayed it with water and let it sit there for about a week. After about three days, I repeated the spraying, just to be sure.

The bonnet molding on the stand.

The bonnet being molded on the stand.

Once the bonnet was in shape, all I had to do was to tack down the tie in several places.

A top view, with the tie stitched in place.

A top view, with the tie stitched in place.

And here is the finished project. Since I still struggle a little with hat-making, the result is perhaps not the most refined head covering; but it is absolutely wearable. And I find it pretty cute, too. :)

The finished hat / bonnet.

The finished bergére-style hat / bonnet.

And now it is back to the last few days of the thesis for me. I hope this post added a little “pretty” to your pre-Halloween Sunday, as it did to mine. Very soon (hopefully) I will try to show you the other early period head covering I made this summer. And please, have a lovely week and a Happy Halloween tomorrow!

Until very soon, Nessa

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Catching Up: Just a little Fichu

The past week has been a bit busier than expected. So, today’s catch up post will deal with a small, yet nifty, little clothing item: a fichu to go with my working-class ensemble. The one I chose to make is simple, tuckable triangle.

To make it, I had a look at this post from the Oregon Regency Society. It covers fichus in many shapes and sizes. Looking at it tempts me to make at least one of each. One can never have too many fichus … ;) The measurements given in the post may vary based on the wearer’s shoulder width and the back length at the underbust line.

The fichu, 40

The finished fichu, 40″ wide and 18″ high.

I made my triangle 40″ wide at the base and 18″ high, as suggested in the post. It worked fine. The next time, though, I would add another 4″ or so to the long edge. I cut the triangle from an 18″ x 40″ rectangle, with the long edge folded in half. The fabric I used was a sheer cotton voile “lining” a local store carries as a basic.

The two short edges are finished with 1/8″ rolled hems, using my favourite method. On the long side, I got a bit lazy and just hid the raw edge under the lace trim. For that, I ironed under 1/8″ of the fabric, stuck the bobbin lace on top of it and hand-sewed it down with a small running stitch, close to the fabric edge. Since the finished lace edge was about 1/4″ wide, it covered the raw bit no problem. Here is a close-up of the finished trim:

The edge finish.

The edge finish.

I chose to have the lace edge on the back of the fichu, but it would also look nifty on the “good” side. Now the narrow bobbin loops peeking out from under the fold look pretty cute when I wear it. It goes together well with the sheer fabric and does not look too massive. Here is a look at the fichu tucked under the shortgown I still need to blog about.

The front view.

The front view.

The back view.

The back view.

Since it was my first, tucking the  fichu took a little practice. After a playing around for a while, I found that the simplest way to keep it in place was to pin it directly to the stays. When using a simple petticoat, the straps can help to hold it in place. Normal straight pins work well; but for the last event I cheated and used three medium-size safety pins, just to be sure. ;)

I hope you had a good week and found this quick post enjoyable. As the thesis goes into its final throes, a few shorter posts may follow. But I am hoping that I will get to tell you about the shortgown from the pictures very soon. So please stay tuned! :)

Much love, Nessa

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HSM #3: Ladylike Hand Protection

For me, embroidery is one of the best pastimes during exam season. It gives you something to pick up and work on when the paper writing muse is silent or when you simply need to take a little break. That is why I decided to do a small, handy  embroidery project for this month’s “Protection” challenge: A pair of early Regency mitts.

The main inspiration came from these two extant pairs from the Met and MFA collections. The mitts from the Met are an earlier pair from the latter half of the 18th century. At this time, a triangular flap, often with a contrasting piece of fabric sewn to its underside, was a common feature of mitts. Towards the Regency period, this flap slowly disappeared in favour of a straight top, as you can see in the early-19th-century pair from the MFA below.

18th-century mitts, in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum.

Mitts, late 18th – early 19th century, MFA Boston.

Since this has been my first glove-making adventure and I was feeling a little unsure about how to design a pattern, I went to search for resources and found a wonderful tutorial for making Colonial mitts. It uses a pattern based on an extant pair from the Colonial Williamsburg collection. I used it as a base for my own pattern, enlarging it to about 120% and taking off the flap to get a straight top edge.

Next I picked a floral embroidery pattern from Ackermann’s Repository to decorate the top. It is a bud and leaf design I outlined in stem stitch. To fill out the buds, I also used stem. The leaves are filled with alternating satin or fishbone stitch.
Since the fabric I used was a light cotton sateen, I added the embroidery before cutting out the mitts, to prevent fraying in the wrong places. ;) Here is how it all looked in progress:

The embroidery in progress.

Once the embroidery was finished, I cut out the gloves and found that embroidering had been the easy part of this project. So I will give you a brief walkthrough of how I made up my pair, for future reference, in case you are planning to make your own. :)

Gathering the materials.

The first thing I did was to get together my materials. I used sateen for the outer layer and a light cotton shirting from the stash for the lining. All pieces are cut on the bias, to allow for a snug but comfortable fit. In this picture, the thumb holes are already cut out. Before I did that, though, I took an extra step:

Tracing the shape for the thumb hole.

After backstitching and overcasting the thumb pieces’ 1/4″ side seam, I placed the underside of the piece on the right side of the mitt body and traced the shape. I then subtracted 1/4″ on the inside of the trace line for the seam allowance and cut the hole based on that. There was a thumb hole given on the original pattern, but after sewing a test piece, I found that it needed some improvement. And taking the time to re-trace it really did a lot for the fit. :)

The shell and lining, with the side seams sewn and pressed open.

Next I attached the bottom edge of the thumb to the holes, right sides facing and backstitched it in place. Afterwards I just sewed up both the outer and lining pieces at the side seams, taking a 3/8″ allowance. Once all the seams had been pressed open, I slipped the lining over the outer, so that the “clean” sides faced each other and the thumb peeked out of the hole in the lining like so:

The shell and lining matched up at the side seams.

To line the mitts, I sewed the pieces together at the top edge with a backstitch, taking up a 1/4″ seam. After I folding the lining into the mitts, I finger-pressed under about 1/4″ of fabric around the thumb hole and stitched it down, encasing the raw edges on the inside. As a final step, I folded and slip-stitched the bottom hems of the mitts. To keep the lining invisible, I created a slightly deeper fold, so that it came out about 1/8″ shorter than the outer layer.

Once everything was in place, I used a single strand of embroidery floss to create a herringbone borser along the thumb hole. It came out very pretty, but also served to reinforce the fabric against wear and tear.

The finished mitts. :)

Here is what the finished pair of mitts looked like after this final step. I am quite happy with how they came out. Finishing them was a very sweet treat at the end of the exam season. :)

Now the new (and final !) term is here for me. At the moment I am still very busy juicing all the lemons uni throws at me. Although, finally, things are starting to roll again in the sewing room. There are a few new projects coming up and I am much looking forward to sharing them with you.

Thank you all for your patience in bearing with me until now. I will do my best to stop being such a stranger and bring the blog back up to speed again soon.

 

Much love, Nessa

 

HSM #12: The Chemisette

Before completing the whole dress ensemble, here is a look at the chemisette that came together earlier this week. I am entering it into the Historical Sew Monthly “Re-Do” challenge separately, to make up for a few challenges I skipped this fall. Here is what it looks like, worn with the gown:

chem_finished

The chemise and gown – front view.

chem_back20dress

The chemise and gown – back view.

Just like the Regency dress, the chemise is hand-sewn, except for one invisible inner seam. The pattern I used as a base is from Sense & Sensibility’s Regency Underthings pattern. Originally, this version of the pattern offers a flat or standing ruffle as collar options. I decided to make it with the flat ruffle, but found it a bit too boring. ;)

So I cut a second, narrower, ruffle to go on top of it. In the previous post, I already showed you a sneak peek of how I hemmed them using the “magic” rolled hem stitch. To help the top ruffle to lay more nicely, a little bit of starch went into the bottom one.

Here is a look at the finished chemisette without the gown. As you can see, the buttoned section is slightly longer, to accommodate for dresses with lower necklines as well. Perhaps, one day, I will get it into my head to wear it underneath one of those risque-y French gowns. ;)

chem_front

The chemisette front.

chem_back

The chemisette back.

chem_side

A look at the side, with the French seam across the shoulder.

The chemisette closes with both ties and a set of three mother-of-pearl buttons.The pattern actually suggest to close the front with either ties or buttons, yet I felt safer using both. In the Regency era, “gap-itis” on drawstring closure was quite common. So I am perfectly fine with it, in all places but one: the front of chemisettes. ;)

Another thing I changed is the way the buttons fasten. Since the cotton voile I used is extra sheer and I wanted to learn a new technique, I made button loops instead of using regular button holes. All in all, the chemisette’s closure now looks like this:

chem_undone

The closure: A top and bottom drawstring and three buttons with silk thread loops.

Here is another close-up of the loops and buttons. Even though they are made from real mother of pearl, they were not all that expensive. I found them at a local “hippie” store that also sells a plethora of beads for jewelry-making. For the loops I used some off-white silk buttonhole thread. As you can also see here, the thread loops improved as I moved down the line. ;)

loops

My first set of button loops. Yay! :)

If you would like to learn more about sewing thread loops as well, I recommend Professor Pincushion’s video tutorial. It is a bit longer but walks you through the steps very nicely. :)

And that was all about the chemise already. I hope you enjoyed looking at the pictures. :) If you have questions about the tweaks I used in my interpretation of the pattern, please feel free to let me know. Now I will try my best to finish the dress as well, so that I can show you everything before I go home for the holidays.

Until very soon, Nessa

Early Regency Elastic Garters : A Tutorial

It has delighted me to see how many of you are also enamored of all those gorgeous period garters. It feels wonderful to be in such good company. But, admiring is only one side of it all. As costumers, we all love to also re-create the fashions we adore. To get you started on your own pair of drool-worthy garters, here is the promised tutorial on how to make “elastic” early 19th-century garters.

Before we start, it has to be said that the finished garters will not be made in a completely historically accurate way. This is because we will be using elastic cord instead of wire springs to elasticize the garters. Modern elastic varies greatly in its elastic properties, as opposed to the material available in the period. But the end result of this tutorial will be very close to the period look. So, here we go:


You will need:

  • 12″-15″ of elastic cord, approx. 1/8″ wide.
  • 2 pairs of “double” hooks and bars, normally used for in-seam skirt closures.
  • A short length of matching double-fold bias tape, about 6″ long.
  • Needle and thread (matching for the seams and optionally another color to accentuate the cording channels).
  • Four 4″ wide pieces of sturdy cotton fabric, according to your measurements (see below).

Placement and Measurements:

You can place the garters just below, or just above, the knee. To find out how long your fabric pieces need to be, measure snugly around the place of your choosing. For the two front pieces, you will divide this measurement by 2. Then you add 1 1/4″ to it, to get a 5/8″ seam allowance on either side. For a sample calculation: I decided to wear my garters below the knee and measured a leg diameter of 16″. So I ended up with a front piece length of 8″ + 1 1/4″ = 9 1/4″ by 4″ wide.

Obtaining the length of your elasticized back piece is a bit trickier and depends on the bit on how rigid or stretchy your elastic cord turns out to be. First, you need to stretch your elastic cord to see, how much of it is required to go across half your leg diameter. Typically, the amount will vary somewhere between 2/3 and 3/4 of your measurement. With my cord, I needed 6″ to stretch over the 8″ of the finished back piece. Now you can decide if you want a (nearly) flat back piece when wearing your garter, or rather a more ruffled look. Both seem to have existed for period garters and it is up to you, what you like best.

For the “flat” look, you simply take your halved diameter and add a 5/8″ seam at one end. If you would like to shir and ruffle your back piece a little more, you are now going to double the measurement of your elastic cord and add the 5/8″ allowance to that. This is how i did it and I came out with 6″ x 2 + 5/8″ = 12 5/8″ by 4″ wide. Now that you have your measurements, you can go ahead and cut 2 pieces of each.

Making up the garters:

First, fold all your pieces so that the two long edges are touching and press.

Step 2: Add your embellishments to the inside of the folded front pieces, steering clear of the fold and seam allowances.

Next you can decide whether you would like to add embroidery to your front pieces or if you want to ornament them with pieces of patterned ribbon instead. You will be placing your embellishments on one half of the folded front pieces. Since you will later turn them inside out, remember to put the adornments on the inside of the folded piece, making sure not to work over the fold line and seam allowances.

Step 3: Add cording channels to the sewn-up back pieces.

Now you will work on the folded back pieces: Sew along the long, raw edge on either piece, taking up a 3/8 seam. Leave the short ends open, trim the seam and turn inside out. Add two cording channels that are wide enough to hold your elastic cord, starting your first seam about 1/2″ from the top and bottom edges. If you are using 1/8″ cord I recommend you place the cording lines 3/8″ apart (as you can see, mine came out a little too narrow for easy cording).
Optional: Add a fifth seam in between the channels for decoration.

Step 4: Feed the elastic through the channels and secure.

After finishing the channels, cut four equal lengths of elastic cord, according to the calculations above. Feed them through the channels, using a bodkin and, if necessary, a pair of needle-nose pliers. Make sure that a little bit of the cord peeks out at either end and secure it, using straight or, even better, safety pins.
Stay stitch on both sides, close to the edges. This step is crucial, since elastic cord develops a life of its own otherwise. I forgot this when first making up my pair and ended up taking apart and re-cording them because the elastic came loose.

Step 5: Embellish your fronts, fold them back over and mark.

Once you have finished decorating the fronts, fold them back over, right sides facing. Measure 2-3″ from the left edge and mark the point. Now, sew along the right edge of each piece, as well as the long edge, up to the mark you just made. Turn inside out. Your sewn-up fronts will then look like this:

The front piece after sewing and turning.

Step 6: Attach the back pieces to the top side.

Now, place your back pieces on top of the fronts and pin in place. Carefully sew them to the top layer of the front pieces only, while taking up a 5/8″ seam. Make sure to move the back layer out of the way completely. Trim the seam a little, fold the back piece into the front and press.

Step 7: Hand-finish the back of the join.

To finish the front-back join, flip over the pieces. Fold the raw short edges on the back in by about 5/8″ and press, making sure to cover the entire raw edge of the back piece. Finish the side seam and the remainder of the long seam by hand, using a slip-stritch.

Step 8: Bind the raw back edges.

At this point, your garters are nearly down. All you need to do now is cut your length of bias tape in half and use it to bind the remaining raw edge on your back piece. Do it as you would bind a corset, stitching “in the ditch” on the top side and securing the folded-over side on the back with slip stitches.

Step 9: Attach the hook-and-bar closure.

At last, you sew the hooks and bars to close your garters. The double skirt hooks are the closest thing to the, often ornate, hook closures used on period garters. But they do well enough. It works best to attach the hook on the back end, and the bar on the front. If you look at extant pairs, you will find that the bar usually goes on the “pretty” side, right next to the embroidery. Since the modern hooks are not so pretty, I opted to put them on the undersides instead. ;)

The finished product. =)

And your garters are done! Here is a look at my finished product. But I have a feeling that yours will be all the prettier. If you get to try out the tutorial and make your own pair of garters, I would love to see how they turned out.

I will be back with you very soon, once the exams are all over. By then, I am hoping to have some news on my new Regency day dress as well. Now, back to fixing the garter I forgot to stay stitch… See you all very soon!

Cheers, Nessa

HSM “Brown”: The Finished Garters

One day before the end of study, the garters are finally complete. Yay! In this post, I will just give you a quick walk through the finished pair, since I am meaning to follow up with a longer tutorial on them in a little while. Here are some pictures for your viewing pleasure. By the way: did I ever mention that my left leg is skinnier than my right one? ;) You can see that quite nicely in the first photo, too…

The finished pair of embroidered early-Regency “elastic” garters.

A closer look at the embroidery.

The whole garter. The bar matching the double hook is hidden under the embroidered end.

If you compare my garter to an extant one from the early 1800s, you will see that the end which has been elasticized with steel springs is somewhat longer than the one I made using modern elastic cord. When worn, however, this difference is made up and the elastic end covers about half of the leg. This illustrates the difference between steel and rubber elastic rather well.

Extant early 19th-century garter, elasticized with steel wire coils (Source: mfa.org).

And here is a look at the challenge details, showing exactly which materials I have used to emulate the historical style. The base fabric itself is a study cotton, though, since this works best for embroidery. Other than that, it also holds on the the stockings very well. =)


The Challenge: #9 – “Brown”

Fabric: A 4″ wide scrap of white cotton canvas.

Pattern: My own, inspired by several extant garters at the MFA, Boston. The embroidery is based on an 1811 floral pattern from Ackermann’s Repository.

Year: ca. 1790s-1820s.

Notions: 2 ft. of brown 1/8″ elastic cord; 1 1/2 skeins of brown embroidery cotton; some orange embroidery cotton; 2 double hooks and bars.

How historically accurate is it? They are more historically inspired than accurate but emulate the period look very well when worn.

Total cost: €1.50 for the yarn; €1 for the elastic and €2 for the hooks = approx. €4.50. The fabric was “free” at this time.

Hours to complete: About 25-30 hours.

First worn: For the photos.

And that was it already. Once I have a little more time, I will write up a tutorial on how I made mine. They were a first try and may not be perfect. But I know what needs improving and will add these points, so you can profit from my little slip-ups and make your own, even better, pair. So please stay tuned. :)

All the best, Nessa

Garters Galore

Today, the embroidery on the first garter has already come together. On this joyous occasion, I will delve into the subject of early 19th-century garters a little more and provide you with some delicious eye candy. ;)

But, first things first. Here is a look at the status quo of my embroidered garter fronts. By now they are both outlined in back stitch. And the bottom one is already filled with satin and stem stitch. Since some period garters also made do with rather sparse embroidery designs, I did get a bit lazy and decided against filling in all the flowers, too.

The embroidery progress on the garters.

I am quite content with how they are turning out, especially since I am a little pressed for time at the moment. But now, to the really gorgeous extant examples….

Up to the late 18th century, and into the very early 1800s, garters were mainly made of silk ribbons that tied at the top of the stockings to keep them in place. Embroidery was a staple. It was either placed directly on the ribbon or sewn to it, frequently with additional padding added underneath. Often, amorous and/or saucy mottoes were added to the designs. Here is a beautiful example of this style, using some delicious pink silk ribbon:

18th-century silk garters from the MFA, Boston. They read “My motto is to love you; it is never to change”.

Also have a look at this 18th-century pair with narrower ties and a wider embroidery section:

Another gorgeous pair of 18th-centuy garters from the MFA.

Further into the early 19th century, but already as early as 1800, innovation paved the way for another style of garters. It is elasticized using narrow steel springs in one half of the band. If you did not know it was steel, you could be tricked into believing you were actually looking at modern shirring, using elastic bands. This type of garter was fastened with a steel hook. For some time, both the tied and the hooked styles existed side by side. The following picture from the MFA shows them in comparison:

Comparison of tied and elasticized garters (Source: mfa.org).

Before I started researching, I had no idea that elasticized garters had already come into use this early on. And now, this style really fascinates me. Here are two more extant examples of early “elastic” garters that have served as my inspiration for the current project. :)

Early 19th-century garters, elasticized with coiled wire (Source: lacma.org).

Early 19th-century garters, auctioned by the Cora Ginsburg Gallery (Found on Pinterest).

There are so many more stunning and gorgeous extant period garters still in existence; more than enough, to fill several blog post. Just have a look around! I especially recommend browsing the MFA’s collection. It holds lots and lots of extant examples from various periods.

I hope this post has helped to awaken your interest in garters. Because, small as they may be, they provide some great examples of period craftsmanship. Even though I am not quite sure how “crafty” my pair will turn out, I will try and keep you posted on their progress.

Much Love, Nessa

HSM #7 : The Finished Regency Bonnet

Now that the first batch of exams is over, I finally put the finished bonnet on my head and took a few photos for you.

Until last week, I worked on the trimmings. I decided to keep them simple. When you look at the 1803 fashion plate I showed you in the making-of post, you can see how this choice was not an uncommon thing at the time, either. So I attached about one yard of plain satin ribbon to hide the join between crown and brim, but also to double as a tie to go around the back of the head.

The other thing I added, was a flower made from the fashion fabric. Since my crafting skills and ribbon roses do not get along very well, I used this lovely tutorial as inspiration. The petals are made of six 3″circles, cut out with zig-zag my shears. Instead of gluing them to a felt disc, as shown in the original tutorial, I simply sewed them together in the center and at the outer edges. To cover up the center join, I added a scrap of ruffled white satin ribbon and a small shank button on top. The result looked like this:

The almost finished fabric flower.

After attaching the ribbon and flower, the completed bonnet looked like this on me:

The finished Regency bonnet.

A better peek at the flower and trim.

To sum it all up, here are the challenge facts :) :

The Challenge: HSM #7 – “Accessorize”

Fabric: Tactel-nylon for the outer layer; cotton net for the lining. The good thing about the Tactel is that it does not have the icky plastic-y feel of most synthetic “silks” and that it is breathable. Without this particular quality, the bonnet would have become a rather sweaty affair.  ;)

Pattern: My own, inspired by this 1803 fashion plate.

Year: 1800-1805.

Notions:An old straw hat brim for the base; satin bias tape; satin ribbon; one shank button; different strengths of cotton yarn.

How historically accurate is it? Rather historically inspired due to the construction method and fabrics used. It is, however, entirely hand-sewn. ;)

Total cost: About € 5, since a lot of things used were scraps or bought off the clearance table.

Hours to complete: About ten.

First worn: For the photos.

And that was it already. I am pretty happy with how my first “proper” Regency bonnet has turned out. Now that it is finished and the exams are off my mind, I will disappear for a long birthday weekend in my dad’s Southern hometown. I will be back with you next week, hopefully with another short corset update. :)

Much love, Nessa

The Clandestine Regency Bonnet: A Quick Making-Of

Without me noticing, the next exam season has crept up on me. So, the blogging and corset-making have fallen a bit short of late. But I am still here and was very happy to receive all the positive feedback on the Sisterhood of the World Bloggers Award. You guys are all amazing sewers and bloggers so it was really, really hard for me to stick to just ten nominations. :)

In other news, looming exams seem to make me creative in quite strange ways. So, the other Saturday I was looking at this 1803 engraving of London headdresses from the Repository:

London headdresses (Ackermann’s Repository, c. 1803).

That moment I remembered that I had no entry for the HSM’s “Accesorize” challenge yet. And I also remembered this really cheap, Frankensteined sombrero hat still lurking in my stash:

A cut-up sombrero from the one-Euro store.

Since the hat is of woven straw and the top was way too high to work for a bonnet crown, I cut it down into the strange shape below. Eventually I then ended up opening the crown at the back and only keeping the brim and a narrow edge of straw above it. And, in fact, it made a surprisingly effective (and cheap) substitute for a buckram base. ;)

The partially cut-down hat-base.

Now, it was time to decide on the style of bonnet I wanted to make. And that was a tough one. Because, every single bonnet and hat in that plate is just really, really beautiful. So, eventually, I settled for making something basic that resembles the general period look and takes up a few elements from varied bonnets in the fashion plate.

As I had to cut off the hat’s crown, I patterned a fabric crown. It is really nothing more than a 60 cm wide circle. I cut it out twice, once from my outer fabric, for the shell, and once from some leftover cotton net, for the lining.

Cutting out the bonnet’s crown.

I then hemmed the circles by folding the edges over once and gathered them on the outside edge. As the two crowns were later sewn together, I matched them up to the desired size as I gathered.

Gathering up the crown fabric.

With my biggest embroidery needle and some matched baby-blue purl yarn, I then attached the outer crown to the brim, by hand-sewing through the straw. If you are brave enough to try this at home, please make sure to wear a thimble of your choosing, since the whole affair can get a bit “poky” otherwise… ;) But, after some tugging and stabbing, the crown and brim actually came together quite nicely.

The brim base and the crown after sewing them together.

At some point, before or after this step (but better before, really…), you should trace around your brim, to get a pattern for its fabric cover which you then cut out twice, with some added seam allowance all around. If your brim is nicer than mine, the bonnet would also look pretty “au nature”, with bias-bound side edges. :)

Before I started covering the bonnet, I sewed the crown lining to the shell, but only around the fabric edge at the back. Then the covering fun started. I began by clipping the inner edges of my cover pieces. Next, I pinned one cover piece to the underside of the brim, basted it in place around the outer edge and attached the unsewn bit of the crown lining to the inner one. The result looked like this:

The inside cover, before basting to the outer edge.

When the inside was all covered, I threw the other cover over the outside and matched it with the inside piece. By the way it looks in the photo, I just had to call this act “throwing” it onto the bonnet. ;)

Draping over the fabric to cover the outside.

At the top edge, I then wriggled the unfinished edge of the cover under the crown’s gathered hem and sewed the two together by hand.

Attaching the top cover underneath the crown.

Finally, I finished the raw side and outer edges with some leftover satin bias tape. Thus is the progress of my secret little bonnet project so far. It all looks a bit big and wriggly on Jane, calling for a nice ribbon tie and some trimmings.

The finished front side, after binding.

The 1800s bonnet so far.

Now, I only have to see how to get them done by the end of this month with two more exams waving at me. But I am sure I can work something out… Hoping to see you all again soon. You are not forgotten!

Love, Nessa

P.S.: The corset is also well underway: The test corset is fitted and all the supplies are here now. This means I can soon start cutting it out. Yay!

Practicality: The Finished Edwardian Pinafore

After some procrastination about taking the pictures, it is now time to present the finished Edwardian pinafore to you. I finished the last seam on the night I posted the apron how-to. And now, I am very proud to share the, simple but very pretty, end result with you. So, without much ado, here it is. I hope you can excuse the slightly messy sewing room…

The finished pinafore – front view, with closed belt.

The side with the nearly waist-deep armhole.

The back view.

.The pinafore apton belt you can see in the pictures is about 1 1/2 inches wide and loops loosely around the waist, as to cinch the mess of fabric a bit, without limiting freedom of movement. As you can see here, it closes on the left-hand side, with a single, sturdy hook-and-eye fastener.

The belt closure on the left front side.

Here is also a picture of the yoke’s lining, which was meant to be made of striped fabric in the original instructions, while the shell fabric was supposed to be plain. Initially, I have tried out this variation, but the stripes kept on shining through. So I went for the, more practical, all-striped version instead…

The finished yoke, with canvas lining and pleated shoulder trims.

And here are the concise challenge details, to finish off:

The Challenge: HSM #5 – “Practicality”.

Fabric: 2 1/2 yards of woven-stripe cotton shirting, plus  a 15-inch square of white cotton canvas for the yoke lining.

Pattern: An extant pattern from “Buch der Wäsche” by Brigitta Hochfelden (c. 1900).

Years: 1900s.

Notions: Cotton bastiste for the hand-pleated shoulder trim; cotton bias tape to bind teh armholes; cotton thread; one large hook and eye for the belt closure.

How historically accurate is it? I followed the original pattern instructions very closely and put some effort into finding a smooth, sturdy shirting to match the, originally recommended, madapolam cotton. I machine-sewed most of the larger seams, but limited myself to straight-stitch, as would have been availlable to home sewers with a period threadle machine. So, all in all, it should pass as accurate.

Total cost: € 15 for the shirting and about € 3 for the canvas and the notions. In the spirit of the challenge, I tried to be especially practical and used self-fabric where the pattern asked for contrasting fabric and forewent the recommended, ribbon-trimmed shoulder ruffles for a simple, hand-pleated trim from scrap fabric.

Hours to complete: About 30 hours.

First worn: Around the house for needlework and smaller cleaning tasks. They are just so much more fun while wearing the pinafore. :)

And that was it for tonight. I will try to be back shortly with some updates and inputs on my upcoming project. To keep matters exciting, I will only say that it will be somewhat bigger, and probably the largest project of my sewing year. Oh, and to match the next HSM challenge’s “Out Of Your Comfort Zone” theme, it will include some awe-inspiring techniques I have not used before.

I will see you very soon. Until then, I am wishing you a wonderful holiday weekend.

Love, Nessa