A 17th-century hood – a year later

Whoops, has it already been a year since I found the job? Apparently it has, and it has been a turbulent one. I spent much time adjusting, quietly sewing away in my corner, doing some creative writing, and tentatively volunteering at a local museum. Somehow, blogging fell short among it all.

Now I remembered that I have not yet told you anything about the early to mid-17th-c. linen hood I finished last summer, shortly before the move. Tonight I finally find a moment to do so. Here goes:

Documentation

As it turns out, loose hoods in the 17th-century are a fickle thing. They appear everywhere and nowhere. The little solid evidence I have comes from two ladies’ clothing inventories cited in “Seventeenth-Century Women’s Dress Patterns 1”. Here a hood (one in each source) is listed alongside the ruffs. This can mean two things: First hoods might have been worn with ruffs a lot or second, someone meticulously grouped all the linen accessories into one section. ;)

Another source are two paintings. One is a less well-known English portrait from the British Prime Minister’s estate at Chequers. The other is a Vermeer, showing a plainer Dutch hood in a later, slightly different style.

Mary Hawtrey, Lady Wolley, c. 1625, English School, attributed to the circle of Marcus Gheeraerts.

Young Woman with a Water Pitcher, c. 1662, by Johannes Vermeer, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Accession no. 89.15.21

There has been some speculation that these hoods were less visible in public than other headgear because they were probably a more private, indoors-y accessory. It makes sense as they would be more fuss-free to put on than some caps, for example during the morning toilette. Of the two extant hoods I found, one has a split back seam, which could point to the wearer’s hair being stuffed loosely underneath. But that is just a theory.

The extant examples are the c. 1610-20 linen hood at the V&A, from which the pattern in the book is taken and another, c. 1640, British cotton hood at the Met museum. From further away, this cotton looks a bit like a creamy silk organdy though. ;) In the pictures, you can see the partly open back seam.

Cotton hood, British, c. 1640, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Accession no. 1975.203

Linen hood, c. 1610-20, British, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, Accession no. T.206-1970.

Construction

The construction of the hood is fairly simple. It only has two pattern pieces, the rounded hood shape itself and a gore that is set into each side.

Hemmed hood piece with the gore opening.

All pieces are joined together with insertion lace on the original. I opted for a simpler method and joined everything with a plain faggoting stitch, worked over the hemmed edges. I am not 100% certain how historically accurate my approach was. The crochet cotton I used was definitely not period correct…

Faggoting stitch between the pieces.

The folded hood with both gores inserted.

The Result

I am really pleased how pretty the hood turned out. The light ramie-cotton blend fabric I found on sale was perfect for it. I made a matching kerchief from it as well. :)

The finished product, showing off all the splits and gores.

And that was it for the first post in a long, long while. I am hoping there will soon be more were this one came from.

Thank you for reading. Wishing you all a pleasant week. :)

Ness

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A Sewing Sunbonnet

While I was working on my entry for the current Historical Sew Monthly challenge, the weather here decided to become unusually warm for May. So I could sit outside and sew on the terrace. Because it was very sunny out there, I decided to whip up a quick sunbonnet over the long Pentecost weekend. Since this month’s HSM theme was “Specific Time of Day or Year”, it became a bonus entry of sorts.

I used the slat sunbonnet pattern by the wonderful Elizabeth Stuart Clark. You can download the PDF for free on the Sewing Academy website.

Being a mid-19th-century pattern, this is a little outside my usual sewing periods. But precursors of this useful bonnet style have been around since at least the 1830s. Most earlier examples are stiffened with cording like this one from c.1835. Twila made a beautiful corded Regency bonnet that is quite similar. You can find her tutorial for it here.

Sunbonnet, cotton, c.1840, Metropolitan Museum.

Slats, like in my version, came in a little later. Here is an especially pretty example in fine linen, with slats, from around 1850. A combination of both slats and cording was not unusual either. Very similar, quilted varieties of these bonnets could be worn in the cold season, too.

Sunbonnet, linen, c. 1850, Metropolitan Museum.

Slats were made from stiff materials that added shape to the bonnets’ fabric brim. The pattern suggests using manila paper or something similar. Since the slats are removed for washing, the stiffening does not have to be waterproof. Though I was not looking forward to having wet paper stuck inside the fabric when it rained. So I used the opportunity to try out Lina’s DIY buckram tutorial on a 12″ by 16″ scrap of cotton canvas.

Making cornstarch paste for the buckram.

It worked like a charm and the fabric can be re-starched as needed. She suggests to iron the buckram dry. A quick dry out in the sun worked fine, too.

The dried cotton buckram.

I cut most of my slats 2″ wide, to speed up sewing the channels. Only the outer ones, near the ear, are 1″ wide, like in the original pattern. It took a moment to fiddle them in between the voile facing and outer fabric. But now they sit snugly in their channels. I did not have to tack down the facing to keep them inside at all.

Cutting the slats.

Here is a front view of the brim.

All my fabrics are white, including the checked cotton percale from my stash. They go together nicely, though I might dye the bonnet a different colour, next time I decide to do a round of dyeing in the washing machine.

To tie up the back, I used two 14″ pieces of 5/8″ wide satin ribbon, also from my stash. The pattern says to add a pair of tape ties inside, to keep the sunbonnet from flying away. Mine is doing fine without. So far at has not even slipped around while I was out there, sewing.

All in all, this bonnet was a fun spontaneous project. It just sort of happened from one day to the next. I think it is even the fastest historical item I have ever sewn by hand, coming together in just over ten hours, from pattern drawing to finish. At the moment, it is the most worn one, too. Here is a selfie of me puttering around in it on the terrace last week.

Awkward terrace selfie…

Did I mention I am not good at taking those? Still I am very happy with this sunbonnet altogether. It is a lot of fun to wear and just shades the face enough to keep me from squinting at my handsewing. Now I am definitely ready for more outdoor sewing adventures this summer.

Nessa

Adding Some Bling

Actually, wearing and making jewelry were never really my thing. But, since I am into historical costuming, I realized that the ladies of “my” eras really loved their bling. And that changed my mind. Now I really love the look of historical and historically inspired jewelry. Since my costuming budget is somewhat tight until further notice, I can only dream about buying pieces from one of the many talented makers of historical jewelry out there. Hopefully, one day I can support those wonderful people with a purchase.

Until then I had to find a way to make do and started looking around YouTube for some simple jewelry making tutorials. It all looked very complicated to beginner me but eventually I decided to give it a try. Then, some months ago, the only jewelry supply nearby was turned into an outlet store with 50% off everything. That motivated me to try and make some simple bling to go with my costumes. And this are the results so far:

The first I made was the string of corals and matching earrings from some beads I had bought ages ago. This was my first pearl knotting project and it got me hooked. The corals had teeny tiny holes and I probably swore a lot as I fiddled around with my extra fine pearl needle. But in the end, I was very happy with the finished mini parure. I am looking forward to wearing it with my Regency attire. :D

A knotted coral mini “parure”.

Next, I made a sweetwater pearl necklace for the Historical Sew Monthly’s “Fastenings” challenge. Knotting these pearls went much faster. As with the corals I used matching linen twine, finished with clear nail polish.

Knotting away…

The necklace closes with 12″ ribbon ties, sewn through two pretty cast metal rings. Because I am a chicken about losing it, I added a detachable hook underneath. The finished thing makes me really happy. And the best part, neither of the two pearl necklaces cost more than €15 to make.

The finished pearl necklace.

Last week I found two matching fayx pearl drops which I just had to tearn into ear hangers. Now I am all set to wear some sparkle with my 17th-century outfits as well.

Matching pearl drops!

Slowly this is becoming a somewhat addictive side hobby. When I last went past the jewelry store, I discovered they had some pre-made collets, and they were pink! So I simply could not say no to them. It took about two hours to attach all the split rings. The finished collet necklace is more historical-ish.

My first collet necklace, sort of. ;)

Now I am pondering to make a matching bracelet, just in case I need something nice to wear with Regency full dress. And I do not even have a full dress ensemble completed yet. Oops. Looks like my inner Gollum put the cart before the horse. My precious… LOL

But now I have the best excuse to start planning for a new bib-front gown to match the bling. ;)

Nessa

Little Project Show & Tell

There have been a lot of little projects going on lately. They are too small to write a blog post about each. So I thought to give it a go and sum them all up in a single post. If it works out well, I might do this more often to fill the gaps between bigger project updates. So here come my three current mini projects.

First I have been working on two small, tuckable fichus with bobbin lace trim. They are much like the one I wore to the market last year, simple triangles that are about 20″ high and 40″ wide at the bottom. The first one is all finished and I am about to start on the second one.

Making cotton voile fichus. One down, one to go.

What I just finished is a length of gold trim for my prospective 1630s gown. It is a simple square knot macramé pattern, worked in cotton and lurex cord. It was a lucky find in the Christmas section at the one-euro store. Out of 6 yards of cord, I got 30″ of trim. Since I am working in increments, to have manageable bits of cord, working through it all will take some time. Hopefully I will have enough trim in time for the finished gown. ;)

Macramé gold trim in the making.

The other project I have just started is a small crewel embroidery piece. When it is done, it will be a sweetbag. I found the pattern on Amie Sparrow’s blog. She has copied some gorgeous 16th-century patterns and made them available for personal use.

Ready for the embroidery on the sweetbag.

Right now, I cannot share too much about this project, because it will be a surprise for a friend. So shh… ;)

And these are the projects keeping me busy at the moment. What are your current projects? I would love to hear about them! :)

Nessa