A 17th-century hood – a year later

Whoops, has it already been a year since I found the job? Apparently it has, and it has been a turbulent one. I spent much time adjusting, quietly sewing away in my corner, doing some creative writing, and tentatively volunteering at a local museum. Somehow, blogging fell short among it all.

Now I remembered that I have not yet told you anything about the early to mid-17th-c. linen hood I finished last summer, shortly before the move. Tonight I finally find a moment to do so. Here goes:

Documentation

As it turns out, loose hoods in the 17th-century are a fickle thing. They appear everywhere and nowhere. The little solid evidence I have comes from two ladies’ clothing inventories cited in “Seventeenth-Century Women’s Dress Patterns 1”. Here a hood (one in each source) is listed alongside the ruffs. This can mean two things: First hoods might have been worn with ruffs a lot or second, someone meticulously grouped all the linen accessories into one section. ;)

Another source are two paintings. One is a less well-known English portrait from the British Prime Minister’s estate at Chequers. The other is a Vermeer, showing a plainer Dutch hood in a later, slightly different style.

Mary Hawtrey, Lady Wolley, c. 1625, English School, attributed to the circle of Marcus Gheeraerts.

Young Woman with a Water Pitcher, c. 1662, by Johannes Vermeer, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Accession no. 89.15.21

There has been some speculation that these hoods were less visible in public than other headgear because they were probably a more private, indoors-y accessory. It makes sense as they would be more fuss-free to put on than some caps, for example during the morning toilette. Of the two extant hoods I found, one has a split back seam, which could point to the wearer’s hair being stuffed loosely underneath. But that is just a theory.

The extant examples are the c. 1610-20 linen hood at the V&A, from which the pattern in the book is taken and another, c. 1640, British cotton hood at the Met museum. From further away, this cotton looks a bit like a creamy silk organdy though. ;) In the pictures, you can see the partly open back seam.

Cotton hood, British, c. 1640, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Accession no. 1975.203

Linen hood, c. 1610-20, British, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, Accession no. T.206-1970.

Construction

The construction of the hood is fairly simple. It only has two pattern pieces, the rounded hood shape itself and a gore that is set into each side.

Hemmed hood piece with the gore opening.

All pieces are joined together with insertion lace on the original. I opted for a simpler method and joined everything with a plain faggoting stitch, worked over the hemmed edges. I am not 100% certain how historically accurate my approach was. The crochet cotton I used was definitely not period correct…

Faggoting stitch between the pieces.

The folded hood with both gores inserted.

The Result

I am really pleased how pretty the hood turned out. The light ramie-cotton blend fabric I found on sale was perfect for it. I made a matching kerchief from it as well. :)

The finished product, showing off all the splits and gores.

And that was it for the first post in a long, long while. I am hoping there will soon be more were this one came from.

Thank you for reading. Wishing you all a pleasant week. :)

Ness

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A Sewing Sunbonnet

While I was working on my entry for the current Historical Sew Monthly challenge, the weather here decided to become unusually warm for May. So I could sit outside and sew on the terrace. Because it was very sunny out there, I decided to whip up a quick sunbonnet over the long Pentecost weekend. Since this month’s HSM theme was “Specific Time of Day or Year”, it became a bonus entry of sorts.

I used the slat sunbonnet pattern by the wonderful Elizabeth Stuart Clark. You can download the PDF for free on the Sewing Academy website.

Being a mid-19th-century pattern, this is a little outside my usual sewing periods. But precursors of this useful bonnet style have been around since at least the 1830s. Most earlier examples are stiffened with cording like this one from c.1835. Twila made a beautiful corded Regency bonnet that is quite similar. You can find her tutorial for it here.

Sunbonnet, cotton, c.1840, Metropolitan Museum.

Slats, like in my version, came in a little later. Here is an especially pretty example in fine linen, with slats, from around 1850. A combination of both slats and cording was not unusual either. Very similar, quilted varieties of these bonnets could be worn in the cold season, too.

Sunbonnet, linen, c. 1850, Metropolitan Museum.

Slats were made from stiff materials that added shape to the bonnets’ fabric brim. The pattern suggests using manila paper or something similar. Since the slats are removed for washing, the stiffening does not have to be waterproof. Though I was not looking forward to having wet paper stuck inside the fabric when it rained. So I used the opportunity to try out Lina’s DIY buckram tutorial on a 12″ by 16″ scrap of cotton canvas.

Making cornstarch paste for the buckram.

It worked like a charm and the fabric can be re-starched as needed. She suggests to iron the buckram dry. A quick dry out in the sun worked fine, too.

The dried cotton buckram.

I cut most of my slats 2″ wide, to speed up sewing the channels. Only the outer ones, near the ear, are 1″ wide, like in the original pattern. It took a moment to fiddle them in between the voile facing and outer fabric. But now they sit snugly in their channels. I did not have to tack down the facing to keep them inside at all.

Cutting the slats.

Here is a front view of the brim.

All my fabrics are white, including the checked cotton percale from my stash. They go together nicely, though I might dye the bonnet a different colour, next time I decide to do a round of dyeing in the washing machine.

To tie up the back, I used two 14″ pieces of 5/8″ wide satin ribbon, also from my stash. The pattern says to add a pair of tape ties inside, to keep the sunbonnet from flying away. Mine is doing fine without. So far at has not even slipped around while I was out there, sewing.

All in all, this bonnet was a fun spontaneous project. It just sort of happened from one day to the next. I think it is even the fastest historical item I have ever sewn by hand, coming together in just over ten hours, from pattern drawing to finish. At the moment, it is the most worn one, too. Here is a selfie of me puttering around in it on the terrace last week.

Awkward terrace selfie…

Did I mention I am not good at taking those? Still I am very happy with this sunbonnet altogether. It is a lot of fun to wear and just shades the face enough to keep me from squinting at my handsewing. Now I am definitely ready for more outdoor sewing adventures this summer.

Nessa

Little Project Show & Tell

There have been a lot of little projects going on lately. They are too small to write a blog post about each. So I thought to give it a go and sum them all up in a single post. If it works out well, I might do this more often to fill the gaps between bigger project updates. So here come my three current mini projects.

First I have been working on two small, tuckable fichus with bobbin lace trim. They are much like the one I wore to the market last year, simple triangles that are about 20″ high and 40″ wide at the bottom. The first one is all finished and I am about to start on the second one.

Making cotton voile fichus. One down, one to go.

What I just finished is a length of gold trim for my prospective 1630s gown. It is a simple square knot macramé pattern, worked in cotton and lurex cord. It was a lucky find in the Christmas section at the one-euro store. Out of 6 yards of cord, I got 30″ of trim. Since I am working in increments, to have manageable bits of cord, working through it all will take some time. Hopefully I will have enough trim in time for the finished gown. ;)

Macramé gold trim in the making.

The other project I have just started is a small crewel embroidery piece. When it is done, it will be a sweetbag. I found the pattern on Amie Sparrow’s blog. She has copied some gorgeous 16th-century patterns and made them available for personal use.

Ready for the embroidery on the sweetbag.

Right now, I cannot share too much about this project, because it will be a surprise for a friend. So shh… ;)

And these are the projects keeping me busy at the moment. What are your current projects? I would love to hear about them! :)

Nessa

Pins Pins Pins

Pins are a real sewing staple. We use them very, very often and still hardly talk about them. This why I want to write about them today.
Lately I have been working on a few different sewing projects. And I realized that I have been using many different pins for them. So I thought I would give you a little “tour” of my pin collection and tell you a bit about which ones I use for which sewing tasks. Perhaps you are using you can find a new pinning idea for your sewing in this post. :)

My pin collection (left to right): Standard steel pin, veil pin, glass head pin, fiberglass pin.

Steel pins are my tiny workhorses. I use them to hold together most standard fabrics, such as (poly-)cotton or wool. When in costume, I also use them as dress pins, to secure the layers on top of my stays. Although some people worry that they might prick themselves, I have never had that problem. My trick is to pass them in out of the fabric a few times, as if I was sewing with them. Then I make sure the pointy end comes out on top and everything is fine. The two things that annoy me about steel pins are that they bend easily and that they seem to get dull more quickly than other pins. Of all the pins I use, I have to replace these most often.Glass head pins are my new love. I only bought my first pack last month. Since then, I have mostly used them in stay-making and to fit mock-ups. They stay in place more reliably than average steel pins. I also find that they iron better and I iron over my pins a lot. The only downside I see at the moment is that they do not pick up so easily. Sometimes when I try to pinch the head between my fingers, the pin literally jumps to the other side of the room. Besides, good-quality glass head pins are not really cheap. Which is why I only got mine now… but it was a good investment!

Fiberglass pins are what I use to pin silk or other fine fabrics, such as sateen or voile. They slide in and out easily; sometimes even too easily. Also, they never get dull. But you do not usually find these pins in many places. I got mine at a store selling all kinds of novelty items. You might have to search around quite a bit to find a seller that carries them. I really wished more places would sell these cool little things.

Veil pins are basically 3″ long mini hatpins. And that is how I use them. When working on millinery projects, they are great for holding the hat/bonnet base on the styrofoam head. Of course you can also use them as decorative pins on mantles, cloaks or veils, as the name suggests. ;)

Another, amazing, thing I discovered recently are wonder clips. Once upon a time, they were mostly known to quilters. Now more and more sewers are discovering them. It took some time for them to come to Europe, now we can even buy more affordable no-name clips. They work just as well as the Clover ones. Recently I have used them when binding my stays. It was much easier than sticking in a pin every half inch or so.

Binding the 17th-century stays with wonder clips … and pins ;).

And this concludes the brief tour around the pin collection. Now I am curious about your sewing and costuming experiences with different pins. Looking forward to hearing from you!

Love, Nessa

CoBloWriMo 2017 in Reflection

Here is my reflection post, fashionably late as so often, to look back on an exciting month of blogging. Before embarking on the CoBloWriMo journey for the first time, I was really not sure if I could get out a post every day. But then the blog was in a horrible backlog and it left my blogging mood like…

Portrait of Laure Bro de Comères by Théodore Géricault (c. 1818).

Then I decided to just let CoBloWriMo happen and to post as much as I could. And now the project post are finally up to speed again, for the first time in a year. And there is more: I got to know many new-to-me costume bloggers who make the most amazing things. And a sense of community has begun to form between us, as we got to read and follow each other’s posts over the course of the month.

Admittedly, towards the end of August, some personal stuff came up on my end and post started flagging a bit. Then Blogger acted up and I could no longer comment on the blogs hosted there. Working on fixing the issue now so I can follow and comment on the work of all the amazing people I “met” through the CoBloWriMo group.

Lastly, participating has given me back some of my old blogging mojo. I learned how to post from the WordPress app on my phone and actually have new ideas for posts again. There might be a new tutorial and some other fun stuff coming up here very soon. :) In summary, my blogging mood post CoBloWriMo is something like this…

Fashion plate of an evening dress (c. 1812).

Sending a big thank you to the organizers of CoBloWriMo and everyone who participated. You are an awesome bunch of people and I miss you already. I am much looking forward to staying in touch with your blogs and seeing all your projects in future.

Much love, Nessa

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Not in a million years … I thought (CoBloWriMo #20)

Tonight I have some news to share with you: Just in time for the “not in a million years” prompt I finished the binding on my 1620s stays! And this is really something I would not have believed to be doing in a million years.

When I started sewing, I was positively terrified of working on corsetry, let alone fit my own patterns. This, however, was four pairs of stays ago. And things kept getting better with each one.

The first short stays were a catastrophe. Then came the Laughing Moon long stays. They were a big challenge, but the pattern instructions were a great help, as was the generous fitting advice on the Regency Facebook groups. After that, things kept getting better.

My self-drafted morning belt went together quickly, after just a few fits of swearing over the pattern. And now, there are the 1620s stays. When I started them, I was as terrified as ever. Although, aside from being super time-consuming, I have not yet come across any bigger snags.

One thing that really helped with it was Cathy Hay’s corset binding tutorial at Your Wardrobe Unlock’d. And now, the unbelievable has happened. Here are the bound stays, drying after a little spot cleaning to remove the pattern marker. Yippee! I made the binding from leftover lavender linen. The rest of it makes up the interlining.

The bound 1620s stays.

Next up are scores of hand-sewn eyelets. Another thing I believed I would not be doing in a million years. But, oh well, one truly grows with every corsetry project!

Nessa

Loving My Awl (CoBloWriMo #18)

When there is one tool in my sewing kit I adore, it is my awl. It is a Clover tapered awl I bought when making my Regency Long Stays.

The new awl, fresh out of the corsetry supply package. ;)

Before that, I used a straight awl for leather work to poke my eyelets. Although that awl has a nice, wooden handle, that was not much fun to do. Instead of properly pushing the threads apart to form a neat hole in the fabric, the old thing snagged a bit. 

For my new “baby” that is no problem. I can also control the width of the holes better, by choosing how far I push it through. Plus, with the plastic tip on, the awl makes a great point turner. :)

My precious… awl.

Just yesterday I saw that others use and love this awl, too. Jennifer, for once, is just using it for the hand-bound eyelets on her new, gorgeous 18th-century stays. They are going to be so lovely! 

Speaking of which … I should get a move on with my 1620s pair. Binding them has thrown me off the blogging schedule a bit. But I am almost done now and ready to swing my awl. Wish me luck!

Yours, Nessa

Why I sew and love Regency costume (CoBloWriMo Days 4 & 5)

Yesterday was spent boning the 1620s stays. And, yay, they are officially boned now! Photos will follow. So tonight is spent catching up on the CoBloWriMo fun I have missed. The prompts for the past two days have been to blog about our favorite era and to tell the story of how we got into costuming / costume blogging.

Those two points go together nicely, so here goes the story. Usually I try not to get too personal on the blog, but today I might make an exception, or two.  ;)

First of, I have been a part of the costuming world for about five years now, and it is one of the best journeys on which I have ever been. Before that, I was just very interested in costumes, both historical and ethnic. In my teens I sketched a lot of costumes to accompany fanfiction and other stories I wrote. Some time ago I ran across a folder with in a drawer with some of those sketches still inside. I had forgotten I had done most of them in ball pen… oh my goodness *chuckle*.

With the costume journey my sewing journey began as well. I had not sewn much, aside from the usual mending, before starting my first costume, an 1850ish wrapper. It took ages to finish and I learned the skills I needed off Youtube tutorials. Up to that point, my relationship with crafting and needleworks had been very complicated. On the one hand I come from a family of talented knitters, cross-stitchers and sewers. My grandmother, for one, was a tiny lady who had to make and alter most of her own clothes. She was already old when I was born and we only spent the first ten years of my life knowing each other. But I remember going out with her one fall, to collect chestnuts. It felt like going on a promenade with the perfect 1930s lady in a tailored wool coat, feathered fedora and fur stole. This was when I decided I want to be such a lady one day, too.

On the other hand, any crafting endeavor since nursery school had been connected with frustration and self-doubt. The main reason for this were teachers and educators who had no patience for the clumsier kids like me. As a result, I have been told “you can’t do it!” more often than I can count. And it stuck, until well into my teens. Eventually I stopped caring what people thought of me or my skills and just started trying out crafts at my own pace. I found a mentor in my high-school art teacher and majored in Art although everyone but the two of us thought I would fail graduation if I did. Although in the end it was my best subject and I learned to use my creativity as well as my hands.

After falling back in love with embroidery around the age of 16, it took another six years for sewing and costuming to come around. I had had a friend in the SCA before that but never believed there were more people like her who sewed actual, historically accurate clothes. Then I started googling, found The Dreamstress, Fashion Through History *waves at Åsa* and the Historical Sew Monthly. After that the list of fascinating historical costume blogs to read grew and grew. I was hooked and decided to give it a try.

Everything started in the same year as my study abroad term in Vienna. By the time I got there I had finished the wrapper and a sort-of Regency day dress. I was yet undecided if I should fully dive into the hobby or which period to sew. Then I found something interesting. By the time Wien Museum (a comprehensive museum of Vienna’s city history) still ran an open fashion library at Palais Hetzendorf. My first visit there was just amazing. It took care of any further questions. I came in, asked the librarian about extant journals and she inquired which time period she should get me. Totally clueless, I asked back which was the earliest they handed out to visitors. A moment later I had issues of Ackermann’s Repository from 1800 on my study table. Ever since, Regency has been my main and favorite era. This shawl dress from Wiener Moden Zeitung has been my dream gown ever since.

Wiener_Moden_zeitung_1

Promenade dress from Wiener Moden-Zeitung (c. 1816).

The plate with the yellow Corinthean robe I use as my blog image comes from the same journal. It looks like a pretty close Regency resemblance of myself, glasses and all. ;)

corinthian dress

Corinthian dress from Wiener Moden-Zeitung (c.1810-20).

There is another funny story about my relation to the French Empire era. I only learned about it from my mother some two years ago. It is this: My middle name is Désirée. It is a bit peculiar seeing how my parents have never been to France, let alone speak a word of French. So I asked why. It turns out, I have been named after Désirée Clary Bernadotte through a series of crazy coincidences. The first is that my father loved novels on the age of Napoleon and had his mind set on naming a daughter after Désirée. She had given Napoleon a run for his money and he admired her for it. Secondly, there was once a Swedish ferry called “Princesse Désirée”, named after a direct ancestor of hers. My mother saw it as a little girl and chose to name her daughter Désirée, too. If that is not peculiar, I do not know what is. Thus, Désirée and her times will always play a special role in my (sewing) life.

Désirée Clary by Francois Gérard (1810).

And this has been my entry for the past two prompts. I hope it has not been too lengthy to read. Tomorrow I will try to be good again and return to the a post a day routine.

Love, Nessa

Regency Gown News

Last time I mentioned that I had some exciting news on the white drop-front Regency gown I am making. Here is the story: The gown was all planned, fabric set aside, measurements taken and pattern drawn. And then I went fabric shopping…

As fellow fabric addicts collectors, you will know what it is like when you have just decided which fabric to use for a project and then something  more delicious comes along, cancelling your previous plans. In my case, I had decided to go with the white cotton muslin I used for my 1920s teddies. Shamefully I have not yet posted about them. So here is a “teaser” pic that shows off the lovely, airy white cotton very well.

My !920s teddies, made from white cotton muslin.

But where there is lovely, there is always lovelier. ;) So, when I wandered into the fabric store, they had some woven pattern cottons on sale. One of them was a gorgeous white-on-white check muslin. Of course, I fell in love and had to buy it at once. It is even softer than my other choice of muslin and has just the right amount of translucency for a Regency gown. It looks a bit dense and bluish in the photo, but it is not.

The new muslin for the gown.

What do you think? Is it not yummy? When I found it, I was so glad I had decided to finish my smock first. Now, though, I have really thrown myself into the work for the gown, since I cannot wait to finally cut it out and see what it looks like. Today, I fitted the toile over my underpinnings. Here it is on my dress form. Next up is altering the pattern pieces to fit and … cutting out. Yippee!

The altered bodice toile on the dress form.

It feels so good to have more sewing time again. I also love to finally share project updates with you as they happen. Hopefully I will soon have news from the 17th-century sewing front as well. While the new Regency gown is coming together, I am also fervently planning away on my 1630s stays. At the moment I am feeling like a historical sewing newbie once more, slightly confused and ogling all the pretty period costumes with big puppy eyes. But that is a good sign, right?

Love, Nessa

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Costume Plans For 2017

It seems the promise to bring you up to speed with this year’s costume plans “soon” now translates into “come April”.  Oops! This is what happens when you get caught between job hunting and moving house… The latter has just been accomplished successfully. So now the update on my historical sewing plans for 2017 can finally go ahead.

Without consciously planning it, my 2017 motto will be “A hundred years forward, two hundred years back” with respect to my usual Regency-era comfort zone. This means I want to work on some costume items from both the 1920s and the French cavalier era, around 1625-30. Both periods are well outside my comfort zone, so I am also planning some Regency items, to steady my nerves in between learning about new-to-me eras. ;)

The 1920s endeavor has already been underway since December. So far, I have finished four pieces for a basic 1920s evening wardrobe. With the evening mantle I made for the Historical Sew Monthly’s March challenge, all that is still missing for now is a matching bra. The plan is to get cracking on it at some point later this year. The pattern for it will come from a 1925 French fashion magazine. And, of course, I will show you the other finished items in a series of catch-up posts!

Brassiere pattern from “La Mode du jour” (1925). Click image for a PDF pattern!

The next big, slightly crazy, project I am just about to start is a journey to the late 1620s. Some time ago, I rediscovered my childhood love of “The Three Musketeers”. This also threw me into a little research frenzy on Cavalier Era costume. This way I learned that it is among the somewhat less popular and more scarcely researched costume eras. Though with the new Renaissance Costume books by Jenny Tiramani, Susan North and colleagues coming out, there has been more general interest lately. And, of course, I jumped right at the challenge…

For now I am hoping to put together one ensemble, to get a feel for the period. I am trying to keep it simple with a smock, bodice/stays, a bum roll (which I already have, yay!), petticoat, overdress and stomacher. Right now I am about to pattern a smock from “Patterns of Fashion 4”. The one in the picture is in the book, too. But I might be leaning more towards a low-neck version at the moment. We shall see how this quest will end! ;)

Woman’s linen smock, Museum of London (c. 1600-18).

The plan to make an overdress came together the moment I saw this gorgeous violet gown at Rüstkammer Dresden. Is it not absolutely lovely?

Violet silk overdress, German, Rüstkammer Dresden (c. 1630-35).

A flat lace collar is also in planning, but perhaps not for this year. I quite like the one in this painting from the 1630s:

Young lady with a plumed headdress, Artist unknown, Manchester City Galleries (c. 1633).

Now that we have arrived at plumes and portraits, I want to share one of my favorite Baroque paintings with you. Naturally my first go at the era will look nothing like this lady’s stunning velvet costume. But, there is nothing wrong with some motivation for the future. :)

Portrait of Saskia van Uylenburg by Rembrandt (c. 1633-34), Gemäldegalerie Kassel.

Aside from these two huge detours in time, some Regency sewing will also be happening. My first Regency project this spring will be a simple white dress to combine with more colorful accessories. I am going for something basic that is not super sheer and matches well with a range of styles. Something like this neat gown in the Met Museum collection:

Sprigged cotton dress, American, Metropolitan Museum (c. 1800-05).

For it I am using the Laughing Moon #130 wrapping front gown pattern. As a sleeve option I am favoring elbow-length sleeves. They are simply the best sleeve option if you ask me. Who agrees?

Laughing Moon Mercantile pattern #130.

Last but not least, this brings me to the aforementioned “colorful accessories”. For this year, I am aiming to make a sleeveless bodice/spencer to go with the white dress. Shape-wise I am looking at something like this one from the Met:

Cotton bodice, American, Metropolitan Museum (early 19th century).

But I want mine to add a splotch of color to the outfit, like the orange example in the fashion plate below. Also have a look at the lady’s wacky “bonnet” hairdo. I have a scrap of leftover IKEA reproduction cotton set aside for my bodice. The floral pattern should be really fun to work with. I am so excited to see how it will turn out!

Fashion plate from Costume Parisien (c.1800).

To be honest, as excited as I am for the Regency projects I have laid out for 2017 so far (maybe some more will follow), I am more than a bit nervous about my self-imposed 17th-century mammoth project. No matter how well it will go, the chances of finishing everything this year are slim. On the upside, you might get to see even more Regency items when things are stalling. ;) I know I can count on your moral support with this challenge and promise not to mope too much when things take up the next five years or so…

For now it is back to the sewing table with me. At the moment, the smock and Regency gown are pulling straws to see which one will be made up first. ;) I will keep you posted on the outcome. Thank you for your ongoing patience with me and the blog!

Much love, Nessa

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